Crane Symposium


Schedule

(Times subject to change)

10–12 June 2018 • Omni William Penn Hotel • Pittsburgh, PA, USA

►Download Schedule (PDF)

Sunday, 10 June 2018

4 p.m.  

Registration

5 p.m.

Reception

Monday, 11 June 2018

7 a.m.

Registration and Breakfast

8 a.m. 

Introductions and Opening Remarks

8:15 a.m.

You May Think You Know, but You May Not
Heath Hooker, Nucor-Yamato Steel Co.
This discussion will focus on rigging safety for all types of application

8:45 a.m. 

Reduce Cost of Ownership of Below-the-Hook Lifting Equipment
Bill Hofmann, Bradley Lifting Corp.
This presentation will be discussing methods of operation, maintenance, inspection and modification that can reduce the cost of ownership of below-the-hook lifting equipment, as well as improve their service life.

9:15 a.m.

Material Handling
John Novak, Primetals Technologies USA LLC
This presentation will focus on safety with the customization of lifting devices and plant-wide evaluations.  

9:45 a.m.

Break

10 a.m.

High-Speed Bridge Conductors — Trials, Tribulations and Solutions
Bill Fillmore, ArcelorMittal Dofasco
This presentation covers numerous challenges involving the AC power collector system, while introducing higher-speed AC VFD cranes. Keeping up with coil movement compared to DC contactor-controlled cranes required faster bridging speeds than those normally experienced

10:30 a.m.

Continuous Conductor Crane Electrification Systems
Adrian Sanchez and Nick Funyak, U-S Safety Trolley
Personnel with extensive crane experience recognize that electrical joints are one the most common sources of crane electrification problems. Due to several physical conditions such as overheating, constant expansion and contraction, etc., electrical joints become loose over time. This causes loss of power, high maintenance and repair costs, and extended downtime. In contrast, continuous conductor crane electrification systems provide an innovative, jointless alternative solution, while maximizing reliability and reducing costs to the end user.

11 a.m.

High-Speed Data Transmission Rails for Process Cranes
Pete Kirst, Conductix Inc.
In the new generation of process cranes, the possibility of remote control operation is a critical component. The emergence of new rail developments, where a bar system can deliver high-speed data transmission, video and data, can safely solve these requirements. The system fits within the same dimensions of a standard four-pole electrification rail system.

11:30 a.m.

Cracking of Ladle Spreader Beams at the U. S. Steel – Mon Valley Works, Edgar Thomson Plant
Steven Bianculli, U. S. Steel Research and Technology Center
At United States Steel Corporation’s Edgar Thomson Plant, spreader beams are used to transport 250-ton ladles of molten iron. The beams are fabricated steel weldments with a box cross-section. Large cracks, 3 and 5 feet in length, were found in fillet welds at the top of the cross-section of one spreader beam. Subsequently, indications of long subsurface cracks were found in a second spreader beam. The cracking was found to have initiated internally at weld roots and propagated outward, making crack detection difficult. The presentation describes inspection and repair techniques employed and metallographic and finite element analyses used to identify the cracking mechanism.

Noon

Lunch

1:15 p.m. 

DC-to-AC Conversion of Meltshop Ladle and Charge Crane
Steve Herron, Morgan Engineering Systems Inc., and Norm Kent, Steel Dynamics Inc. – Structural and Rail Division
For years the hoists of meltshop cranes have been driven by DC mill motors due to their torque capabilities and robust design. Today’s AC motors have proven to provide reliable operation in some of the world’s most difficult applications and environments. Pairing them with today’s variable frequency drives and programmable logic controllers allow for enhancements that deliver high-speed accurate operation while minimizing stresses to the overall mechanical and structural systems. Morgan Engineering provided a solution that fits all of Steel Dynamics Inc.’s (SDI’s) stringent requirements and then some. This solution included new AC motors, a control house with AFE VF drives, festoon, and cabling. This project had many dimensions and requirements — along with a site work plan that would require the crane to be back in service in 10 days. It proved to be a challenging feat that was accomplished ahead of schedule and continues to meet SDI performance criteria.

1:45 p.m.

Safety, Maintenance and Reliability of Overhead Bridge Cranes for Steel Works

2:15 p.m.

Break

2:30 p.m.

Automation for Lifting Crane Magnets
David Baker, SGM Magnetics Corp.​

3 p.m.

Key Considerations for the Implementation of Automatic Cranes
Edgardo La Bruna, Janus Automation LLC
This presentation will discuss key aspects to consider for the implementation of automatic cranes in the metals industry, covering areas such as hazard identification/analysis (HIRAC/PFMEA),  design (layers of protection, functional safety, alternate means of protection),  engineering (installations, commissioning plans, verifications/validations),  manufacturing integration, change management (SIS, risk mitigation, process, equipment), decommissioning and commissioning plans, and state-of-the-art technology used for reliable automation including, positioning, anti-sway, anti-collision, safety and optimization. 

3:30 p.m.

Open Discussion on Industry 4.0 for EOT Cranes​

4 p.m.

Panel Discussion

5:30 p.m. 

Dinner Cruise on the Gateway Clipper

Tuesday, 12 June 2018

7 a.m.

Breakfast

8 a.m.

Introduction and Opening Remarks

8:15 a.m. 

25-Year Study of EOT Crane Wire Rope Drum Failures
Charlie Totten, T& M
EOT cranes have many components in which a failure can result in the interference of operation. There are no more devastating failures then those that result from hoist-broken wire ropes or wire rope drum failures. This 25-year study reveals failure modes of the drum failures and history of causes of both steel producing and rolling mill cranes.

8:45 a.m. 

All About Crane Safety
Bobby Hamilton, Nucor Steel Tuscaloosa Inc.
A quick look at Nucor Steel Tuscaloosa Inc.’s overall crane program with a focus on job setup and interference, and how OSHA 1910.179 and ASME B30.2 apply.

9:15 a.m. 

Know Your Crane Brakes
Jon Walters, Magnetek
In an effort to maintain awareness of the importance of crane brakes, this presentation will examine some of the fundamentals associated with overhead traveling crane brakes that can be easily overlooked. Items to be considered include appropriate brake sizing for a particular application, proper installation, maintenance and technologic enhancements

9:45 a.m.

Break

10 a.m.

Crane Innovator of the Year Award Presentation: The Use of Drones for Crane Runway Inspections
Scott Sambuco, Orbital Engineering Inc.

10:30 a.m.

Crane Certification Association of America, John Davis, Crane Certification of America

11 a.m.

Water Weight Bags
Alex Murray, Water Weights Inc.

11:30 a.m. 

Crane Safety from Radio Control Perspective
Ryan Stortz, HBC-radiomatic Inc.
The goal of this presentation is to bring awareness to wireless control safety with consideration to formal specifications, other factors to consider and safety options for radio controls in the marketplace

Noon

Lunch

1:15 p.m. 

Bearing Installation and Maintenance

1:45 p.m.

AIST Crane Maintenance, Inspection & Repair Handbook Overview
Tom Berringer, Gantrex Inc.​

2:15 p.m.

Break

2:30 p.m.

How To Buy a New Crane
Randy Cantrell, Martin Casper and Ryan Dowd, Konecranes Inc., and Tim Jones, Alcoa
This presentation will discuss key points of a new crane purchase.

3 p.m.

Removing the Fog From the Crane Inspection Process
Larry Dunville, Overhead Crane Consulting LLC
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) only spends about 700 words on crane inspections. OSHA incorporates 197 specs by reference. Plain instructions are needed on who’s responsible for what!

3:30 p.m.

Open Discussion on Maintenance Tips and Tricks

4 p.m.

Panel Discussion

4:30 p.m.

Conference Adjourn