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Howe Memorial Lecture

   
    Ronald Ashburn (right) presented the 2019 AIST Howe Memorial Lecture Award to Carolyn M. Hansson (left) on Monday, 6 May 2019, following her delivery of the Lecture at AISTech.
►Nomination Form
►Award Recipients

History and Purpose

The AIST Howe Memorial Lecture Award was established in 1923 to honor the late professor Henry Marion Howe, who helped turn steelmaking from an art into a science. This award shall be selected every other year on the odd year. The honorary lecturer shall present a lecture on a technical subject of particular interest to the association two years following selection (i.e., selection in January 2015, presentation in 2017).

Nomination Process

Nominations  shall be made by submitting the AIST Award Nomination Form. Three letters of endorsement, a biography and a proposed citation are required with the nomination. This award shall be selected every other year on the odd year. The honorary lecturer shall present a lecture on a technical subject of particular interest to the association two years following selection (i.e., selection in January 2015, presentation in 2017).

All nomination information is considered confidential to the AIST Board of Directors, the Awards & Recognition Program Committee and its subcommittees.

Qualifications

This honorary lecturer is selected in recognition of individual outstanding contributions to the science and practice of iron and steel metallurgy or metallography. Lecture topic shall be provided to and approved by the AISTech Conference Planning Committee chair.

Selection Process

The AIST Awards and Recognition Program Committee shall select a final candidate.

About Henry Marion Howe

Howe attended the Boston Latin School, class of 1865, then Harvard College, class of 1869. In 1871, he graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) with a degree of "graduate in the department of geology and mining science," later renamed a bachelor of science.
He worked from 1872 to 1882 in the iron and then the copper industries, in the U.S., Chile and Canada. From 1883 to 1897, he was a consulting metallurgist in Boston, and simultaneously a lecturer at MIT. His first book, Copper Smelting, was published in 1885. His second book, The Metallurgy of Steel, was published in 1891. In 1897, he took a chair in metallurgy at Columbia University. In 1903, he published Iron, Steel, and Other Alloys. He wrote the "Iron and Steel" article for the Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th edition (1911).
He retired in 1913 and devoted himself to research in his Green Peace Laboratory at his home in Bedford Hills, N.Y. In 1916, he published The Metallography of Steel and Cast Iron.
Howe was elected president of the American Institute of Mining Engineers in 1893, and chairman of the American Society for Testing Materials in 1900. He became a member of the National Research Council in 1918 and became its chairman in 1919.